GFM Network News



Two plants infected with brown girdling root rot (right) and two uninfected plants (left).

How to identify and prevent root rots in canola

If you’re not scouting for root rots, that doesn’t mean they’re not there

Survey data from Western Canada’s provincial agriculture departments don’t have really good numbers when it comes to root rots. The difficulty is not many growers are scouting for them, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t there. The pathogens that cause root rot can impact yield severely, especially if infection occurs early in the season. The […] Read more


Yes to peas, no to aphanomyces

Peas are a great crop for the Prairies, but aphanomyces root rot is a major threat

Peas as a human and animal feed have been around since 5000 BC. The pea plant, a nitrogen-fixing legume, originated in the cooler areas of the Himalayas and was subsequently cultivated extensively in the Mediterranean basin. Peas, dried peas in particular, were a major part of the diet in the U.K. in the 19th and […] Read more

Be aware of aphanomyces in your area or your own cropland.

Preventing and controlling aphanomyces root rot

Aphanomyces root rot is not airborne or seedborne, like clubroot of canola, the disease is soil borne. This fungus, like clubroot, forms resting spores that can last for 10 years in infested soil. Infection of the legume host can take place at anytime in the season but is not obvious early in the year. The […] Read more


Pearce: Multiple modes of action an emerging reality for fungicides

As growers face more challenges from weeds, diseases and insects, many researchers, agronomists, advisers and farmers have shifted thinking from “control” of pests to “managing” them. Some of this trend is attributable to single-mode-of-action products and a reliance on one or two chemistries or technologies — but the adaptability of weed, disease and insect species […] Read more

Healthy (right) versus infected (left) roots in lentils.

Managing aphanomyces root rot in your fields

Q & A with CPS

Q: What is aphanomyces and how should I manage this disease? A: Aphanomyces is a relatively new root rot disease in pea and lentil crops that is quickly expanding across the Prairies. Aphanomyces root rot is caused by aphanomyces euteiches, a soil-borne plant pathogen. The symptoms of aphanomyces root rot are yellowing and stunting of […] Read more


Once root rot has been confirmed, a six to eight year crop rotation can help manage the pathogen's progression.

Managing aphanomyces and root rot

2017 survey results showed a high prevalence of root rot in Prairie pulse crops


Root rot is a soil-borne disease that affects the roots of developing peas and lentils. Root rot can infect crops at any stage, and once it sets in there is no way of stopping the infection. Saskatchewan Pulse crop advisor Sherrilyn Phelps advises growers on best prevention practices. Disease prevention Proper rotation is important. Peas […] Read more



Four canola diseases to watch for

Is that canola crop afflicted by blackleg, root rot, both, or something else entirely? It’s a messy question farmers and agronomists encounter every year. Presenters tried to untangle those problems at CanoLAB in Vermilion this winter. Here are four diseases to watch for in canola fields this summer, and tips on diagnosing them.

Rain increases disease pressures on eastern Prairies

CNS Canada — The recent batch of wet weather across parts of Saskatchewan and Manitoba have been a welcome relief to some fields that were suffering from excess dryness. However, soggy conditions have also enabled certain disease pressures to rear their ugly head, according to some government specialists. “Root rot is showing up in peas […] Read more