GFM Network News



This post-harvest photo of a canola stem with verticillium stripe shows how the stem has senesced and the epidermis is shredding to reveal the microsclerotia.

Verticillium stripe should be on your radar for 2020 and beyond

Three things you need to know about the disease

When Verticillium longisporum-infected canola was first discovered in Manitoba in 2014, it was quickly followed by countrywide soil surveys conducted by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency in 2015. Those surveys revealed V. longisporum populations in British Columbia and every province eastward as far as, and including, Quebec. And while it hasn’t reached the point where […] Read more



Managed money backing out of bearish canola bets

MarketsFarm – Fund traders were backing out of bearish bets in canola while actively putting on new longs during the week ended July 21, according to the latest Commitment of Traders (CoT) report compiled by the United States Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). The net managed money short position in ICE Futures canola came in […] Read more


Canola crush edges up, soybean crush falls

MarketsFarm — As the amount of canola crushed in Canada increased slightly in June, the soybean crush was down significantly, according to the latest monthly report from Statistics Canada. The federal agency on Thursday released crushing statistics for major oilseeds, which showed 864,559 tonnes of canola crushed in June, up 1.12 per cent from the […] Read more

Canola plants that are highly infected with clubroot may have large galls.

Steps to prevent and mitigate clubroot in your fields

Your guide to identification, risk reduction and disease control

Clubroot is a serious soil-borne disease. If conditions are right, it can cause up to 100 per cent yield loss in canola. And while yield loss can be low when conditions aren’t favourable, the pathogen is hardy and easily overwinters in the tough Canadian climate. Come spring, resting spores not only germinate where they overwintered, […] Read more



Two plants infected with brown girdling root rot (right) and two uninfected plants (left).

How to identify and prevent root rots in canola

If you’re not scouting for root rots, that doesn’t mean they’re not there

Survey data from Western Canada’s provincial agriculture departments don’t have really good numbers when it comes to root rots. The difficulty is not many growers are scouting for them, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t there. The pathogens that cause root rot can impact yield severely, especially if infection occurs early in the season. The […] Read more