Latest articles


Check your soil for herbicide residue

Learn how to conduct plant bioassays to detect potential herbicide residues in your soil

Plant bioassays are a simple, inexpensive, accurate and direct method of determining if it is safe to grow crops on land previously treated with known herbicides or on cropland or compost with an unknown history of herbicide use. A bioassay can detect if herbicide or chemical residues are present in the soil or compost at […] Read more


Residual herbicide and crop injury

When the worst happens: what questions to ask and how to soil test for a bioassay

Your cereal, oil seed or legume crop clearly shows that it has been significantly damaged by herbicide application or residual herbicide that was applied to cropland one or more years previously. You are considering possible legal action. What do you do next? First of all, you just don’t take a few photographs, complain about significantly […] Read more



Sunset in wheat field, late afternoon in wheat field - dusk in the cereal field

Copper: For peat’s sake!

Think peaty soil isn’t worth farming? Just add copper to get better results

Peat is nature’s natural organic compost. As a field crop amendment, peat has a lower carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C:N), 60:1, than straw or cattle manure — that’s around 80:1. Canada has 270 million — yes, million — acres of peat lands, making up 25 per cent of the world’s peatland supply. Peat is harvested right across […] Read more


Selling nutrients: the last straw

Practical Research: How to degrade productive cropland by selling the nutrients after the harvest season

Sandy soil areas are not uncommon on the Canadian Prairies, especially west and north of Edmonton, my home area. It made me wince when I saw endless lines of wheat straw bales on countless sandy fields this fall. Technically speaking, straw should never be sold on any kind of cropland unless there is a very […] Read more



Yes to peas, no to aphanomyces

Peas are a great crop for the Prairies, but aphanomyces root rot is a major threat

Peas as a human and animal feed have been around since 5000 BC. The pea plant, a nitrogen-fixing legume, originated in the cooler areas of the Himalayas and was subsequently cultivated extensively in the Mediterranean basin. Peas, dried peas in particular, were a major part of the diet in the U.K. in the 19th and […] Read more


Preventing and controlling aphanomyces root rot

Aphanomyces root rot is not airborne or seedborne, like clubroot of canola, the disease is soil borne. This fungus, like clubroot, forms resting spores that can last for 10 years in infested soil. Infection of the legume host can take place at anytime in the season but is not obvious early in the year. The […] Read more



Tractor spraying soybean field

Avoiding herbicide mis-use

Herbicides have made it easier to feed the world, but beware of residuals and improper use

Herbicides are an integral and essential aspect of modern productive farming. Without our effective and efficient herbicides our dollar costs for food production would be double or triple what we now pay. Can your even visualize hand weeding agricultural and horticultural crops? As a youth I earned pocket money hand hoeing turnips and beets and […] Read more


Why did my cereal crop lodge?

Practical Research: Was it disease? Too much nitrogen? Or was it a copper deficiency in your soil?

This year, 2018, was the year of the lodged crop on the Canadian Prairies. Back in early September, the weather turned cold and much of the Prairies were covered repeatedly with heavy wet snow. In the northern half of the Prairies up to 80 per cent of the crops were yet to be harvested. Fortunately, […] Read more



What’s up honey?

The truth about honeybees’ importance in North America. Hint: it’s less than you think

In the last few years the general public has been bombarded and brainwashed with the supposed tremendous importance of honeybees in North America. Let’s get down to the facts. First of all, honeybees can technically be classified as invasive pests since the honeybee, Aphis melifera, is not native to the Americas — or Australia or […] Read more


The latest buzz on fusarium in cereal crops

Fusarium is destructive, and Alberta’s zero-tolerance policy is in trouble in durum areas

Fusarium head blight (FHB), fusarium graminearum, or tombstone as it’s called in the U.S. has become one of the most destructive diseases of small grain cereals and corn in North America. Fusarium head blight first became a problem in Ontario where it produced toxins on grain corn. Just to confuse you, this disease on corn […] Read more