GFM Network News


Aphanomyces is not currently widespread in Manitoba, but pea growers do need to be concerned about it in the long term.

Two diseases to watch for in peas

Ascochyta blight and aphanomyces root rot occur in dry years as well as wet


If you’re growing peas for the first time this year, of if you haven’t grown them in a while, you’ll want to watch for these two diseases in your fields: ascochyta blight and aphanomyces root rot. The disease that is perhaps most concerning, most visible and most likely to cause yield loss is ascochyta, or […] Read more

In certain rows, Cory’s lentil plants were stunted and the leaves of those plants were turning yellow and shriveling. Some plants in the affected rows were already dead.

Crop advisor casebook: Why are rows of these lentils yellowing and stunted?

A Crop Advisor's Solution from the April 23, 2019 issue of Grainews

Cory owns a 4,000-acre grain farm near Cupar, Sask. His crop rotation consists of lentils, wheat, durum and canola. It was around the middle of June when I received a call from Cory, who was concerned about his lentil crop after he noticed that in certain rows the plants were stunted and the leaves of […] Read more


Yes to peas, no to aphanomyces

Peas are a great crop for the Prairies, but aphanomyces root rot is a major threat

Peas as a human and animal feed have been around since 5000 BC. The pea plant, a nitrogen-fixing legume, originated in the cooler areas of the Himalayas and was subsequently cultivated extensively in the Mediterranean basin. Peas, dried peas in particular, were a major part of the diet in the U.K. in the 19th and […] Read more

Be aware of aphanomyces in your area or your own cropland.

Preventing and controlling aphanomyces root rot

Aphanomyces root rot is not airborne or seedborne, like clubroot of canola, the disease is soil borne. This fungus, like clubroot, forms resting spores that can last for 10 years in infested soil. Infection of the legume host can take place at anytime in the season but is not obvious early in the year. The […] Read more


Healthy (right) versus infected (left) roots in lentils.

Managing aphanomyces root rot in your fields

Q & A with CPS

Q: What is aphanomyces and how should I manage this disease? A: Aphanomyces is a relatively new root rot disease in pea and lentil crops that is quickly expanding across the Prairies. Aphanomyces root rot is caused by aphanomyces euteiches, a soil-borne plant pathogen. The symptoms of aphanomyces root rot are yellowing and stunting of […] Read more

Aphanomyces disease symptoms in the field.

AAFC projects focus on aphanomyces root rot in pulse crops

Good management practices still the best way to control aphanomyces in the field

While improving management practices and reducing risk factors are still the best ways to avoid root rot in pulse crops, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) researchers hope to find other tools. Syama Chatterton, an AAFC research scientist whose areas of expertise include diseases in pulse crops and soil borne diseases, is working on research projects that focus […] Read more


Once root rot has been confirmed, a six to eight year crop rotation can help manage the pathogen's progression.

Managing aphanomyces and root rot

2017 survey results showed a high prevalence of root rot in Prairie pulse crops


Root rot is a soil-borne disease that affects the roots of developing peas and lentils. Root rot can infect crops at any stage, and once it sets in there is no way of stopping the infection. Saskatchewan Pulse crop advisor Sherrilyn Phelps advises growers on best prevention practices. Disease prevention Proper rotation is important. Peas […] Read more

Rick’s pea plants were yellowing and browning off in random patches across the field.

Crop Advisor’s Casebook: What’s got this farmer seeing red?

A Crop Advisor's Solution from the March 28, 2017 issue of Grainews

Rick grows wheat, canola, peas and malt barley west of Hussar, Alta. On July 6, last year, he placed a call to the office after he noticed his pea plants were yellowing and browning off, not just in low-lying areas, but in random patches across the field. He thought there were a few stressors at […] Read more


Ed Seidle farms with his family near Medstead, Sask. He also conducts on-farm research and is an honorary lifetime member.

Ed Seidle learns on the job

This on-farm research program generated info about everything from aphanomyces to root rot

How can producers make sure their on-farm trials produce useful results? Or perhaps a better question is whether growers can, or need to, run trials as rigorously as researchers? Most farmers don’t have the time or patience to run the types of on-farm experiments that scientists do, says Ed Seidle. But that doesn’t mean they […] Read more

Winning the war on pea problems

Weeds, disease and pests will all steal yield from less-competitive pea crops

Disease and pests pose a big risk for growers. A little planning can go a long way to limiting the damage. Peas are somewhat less competitive than some other crops like barley, canola or wheat because their canopy is open a bit longer, so weeds get a better start,” said Dr. Neil Harker, research scientist, […] Read more