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Weather weighed on 2018 Manitoba crop year

CNS Canada – Conditions were variable across Manitoba throughout the 2018 growing season, according to the provincial crop report released Oct. 29.

As of Oct. 29, provincially 97 per cent of the total crop was harvested. Crops completely finished include winter wheat, fall rye, field pea and dry bean. The spring wheat, barley, oat and canola crops are 99 per cent combined. Soybeans are 98 per cent done, sunflowers are at 80 per cent and the corn crop is at 61 per cent complete.

Throughout the province weather conditions were very dry during the growing season. However, precipitation throughout September and October should have helped to replenish the soil for next year.

Crop yields were variable across the province, with many lower than average due to lack of precipitation. The best yields were due to timely rains.

Harvest progress was stalled in mid-September when cold, wet and snowy weather set in across the province. Grain harvested after mid-September required aeration and/or drying mostly. Harvest dragged on throughout the rest of the fall with producers having to take advantage of small windows of favourable weather.

Pasture regrowth was also affected this year due to the dry summer. Throughout the summer there were reports of low hay cut yields and news that there wouldn’t be enough hay for a second cut. Some livestock producers were forced to sell cattle early in order to have enough feed supplies to last through winter.

Seeded winter wheat acres are down overall this fall, while fall rye acres are up. The wet fall was favourable for the early establishment of winter cereals in early September, but the colder conditions towards the end of the month didn’t help with the development of the crops. Germination and stand establishment was fair to good this year, with the crop ranging from being in the one leaf to the four leaf stage currently.

This was the final weekly crop report from the Manitoba government for 2018.

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