GFM Network News


This post-harvest photo of a canola stem with verticillium stripe shows how the stem has senesced and the epidermis is shredding to reveal the microsclerotia.

Verticillium stripe should be on your radar for 2020 and beyond

Three things you need to know about the disease

When Verticillium longisporum-infected canola was first discovered in Manitoba in 2014, it was quickly followed by countrywide soil surveys conducted by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency in 2015. Those surveys revealed V. longisporum populations in British Columbia and every province eastward as far as, and including, Quebec. And while it hasn’t reached the point where […] Read more

When is my canola in the right stage for a fungicide?

Q & A with Nutrien Ag Solutions

Q: How do I determine the correct bloom stage in canola to apply a sclerotinia fungicide? A: Proper timing of fungicide for sclerotinia control requires regular scouting. The recommended timing is application at the 30 per cent bloom stage. Application prior to this stage can result in reduced control as petals susceptible to infection have yet to emerge. […] Read more


A new fungicide from Syngenta is designed to help control fusarium in cereals and sclerotinia in canola.

New protection products coming from Syngenta

New fungicides and a plant growth regulator in the queue for registration

Registration of a new active ingredient is making it possible for Syngenta Canada to bring several fungicide products to the market with promise of improved disease control in wheat and canola, along with a wide range of other field and horticultural crops. Adepidyn (which is the trade name for pydiflumetofen) is viewed as one of […] Read more

Choosing a new seed variety

Q & A with Nutrien Ag Solutions

Q: What factors should I consider when selecting new seed varieties? A: If you’re thinking about a new seed variety on your farm, don’t let yield be the only deciding factor. Selecting a top yielder is important but remember to look at other agronomic factors as well. One of the factors that should be considered […] Read more



Bayer’s Zone Spray is currently set up to help target sclerotinia in canola, but there are plans to incorporate other crop and disease combinations in the future.

Bayer Digital Farming launches Zone Spray

This new cloud-based program helps farmers spray only the right acres

This summer, canola growers will likely again be faced with the tough decision of whether or not to spray fields with a fungicide to protect the crop from sclerotinia. Spraying unnecessarily can mean wasted inputs, but failing to protect crops when needed could also mean significant yield losses. Even if producers decide to spray fungicide, […] Read more


One grower’s experience with biostimulants

Saskatchewan grain farmer, Sean Edwards first tried biostimulants on his crops about five years ago. He wanted to grow healthier plants with less fertilizer and reduce his fungicide use. “We were fairly wet and we had a lot of sclerotinia on our canola and fusarium on our cereals, and root rot in our peas was […] Read more

Sclerotinia on a canola plant stem.

Four tips to help prevent crop diseases

Growers know which diseases exist in their fields and how to manage them, especially widespread diseases like sclerotinia, blackleg and clubroot in canola. However, changing management practices have altered the prevalence of many diseases, leading to an increase in frequency and affected areas due to over-reliance on genetics rather than good management practices. Growers should […] Read more


Four canola diseases to watch for

Is that canola crop afflicted by blackleg, root rot, both, or something else entirely? It’s a messy question farmers and agronomists encounter every year. Presenters tried to untangle those problems at CanoLAB in Vermilion this winter. Here are four diseases to watch for in canola fields this summer, and tips on diagnosing them.

A plug of sclerotinia mycelium is attached to a canola stem with Parafilm.

Measuring sclerotinia resistance

How exactly do researchers and plant breeders separate the susceptible from the partially resistant? They use the stem test. The stem test simulates natural sclerotinia infection of canola, Lone Buchwaldt of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada explains. Typically spores colonize petals that adhere to the plant stem. The leaf axle is a hot spot for infections, […] Read more