GFM Network News


(Photo courtesy Canaryseed Development Commission of Saskatchewan)

Canary seed market seen as dull, static

CNS Canada — Prices for canary seed over the last 15 months have fluctuated between 20 and 23 cents/lb. delivered in Western Canada, and there’s little chance that will change any time soon. To David Nobbs, managing partner of Canpulse Foods in Saskatoon and a director with the Canaryseed Development Commission of Saskatchewan, the canary […] Read more

(FPCommerce.com)

Production outlook keeps canary seed under pressure

CNS Canada — Excess soil moisture is holding up planting of canary seed in Saskatchewan, though according to one market watcher, the overall production outlook for 2017 is good, leaving prices struggling to rise. “Prices are soft,” said Kevin Hursh, executive director of the Canaryseed Development Commission of Saskatchewan. Prices remain locked in the 19- […] Read more


Canary seed market watches peso ahead of planting

CNS Canada — It’s not a stellar time for canary seed prices but the situation could improve, depending on acreage this spring and what the Mexico peso does in 2017. “Prices are not showing a whole lot of strength,” said Kevin Hursh, executive director of the Canaryseed Development Commission of Saskatchewan. “We’re probably in that […] Read more

Canaryseed prices to whipsaw on weather

CNSC – Saskatchewan’s canaryseed spot prices have seen short-term gains, as wet conditions stalled harvest progress, but one industry participant expects the market may drift back down in the long run. “It’s a pretty good crop, it just isn’t in the bin,” said David Nobbs, managing partner of Canpulse Foods, and current chair of the […] Read more


Canary seed carryout most likely underestimated

CNS Canada — Canary seed could be looking at a carryout 10 times the size at which Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada had pegged it, according to one processor. Ending stocks for the recently finished 2015-16 crop year are currently estimated at only 5,000 tonnes, according to the latest AAFC Outlook for Principal Field Crops report. […] Read more

Canary seed growers expecting above-average yields

CNS Canada –– Where other crops are taking a beating, canary seed is reportedly thriving, with early, above-average yields expected. “Canary seed handles excess moisture better than a lot of other crops,” said Kevin Hursh, executive director of the Canaryseed Development Commission of Saskatchewan. “Its yield prospects and production prospects are probably a lot brighter […] Read more


The top one-third of the canaryseed plant heads were turning white and not filling.

Crop Advisor’s Casebook: Bleached canaryseed heads mystery

A Crop Advisor's Solution from the January 20, 2015 issue of Grainews

It was early August when I got a call from Peter, a mixed grains farmer at Claire, Sask. Peter, who grows Hard Red Spring wheat, Soft White wheat, oats, canola, barley, canaryseed and occasionally green peas on his 3,500 acre spread, had a serious problem with his canaryseed crop. He was distressed to see that […] Read more

Canary seed demand tepid, prices moving lower

CNS Canada — Despite now being approved for human consumption, demand for canary seed still hasn’t taken flight — and that’s being reflected in lower prices, one industry specialist says. The largest source of pressure in Canada’s canary seed market is weak demand, according to David Nobbs, chair at the Canaryseed Development Commission of Saskatchewan in […] Read more


Canaryseed for the people

Nine agronomic facts about growing canaryseed, Canada’s newest food product

In 2006, the Canaryseed Development Commission of Saskatchewan (CDCS) formed around a single purpose: to gain approval for the use of canaryseed for human consumption. Checkoff dollars and government programs funded extensive research led by food microbiologist, Carol Ann Patterson. For a decade, canaryseed was put through thousands of hours of toxicological, nutritional, and compositional […] Read more

Seed bread

Canary seed approved for humans

And why not? It’s nutritious and gluten free

I got the news, appropriately, via Twitter, i.e. a tweet: Canary seed has been granted the status of human food. Last month, regulatory authorities in Canada and the United States gave canary seed the human stamp of approval. Which raises the question, if canary seed is for the birds, why would we humans flock to […] Read more