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New Holland adds new power

Designed to appeal primarily to livestock and mixed-farm producers, 
the brand offers more choices in the utility tractor segment

Of all the airline flights I’ve been on, I’ve never had the chance to sit in business class. The closest I’ve come is a quick look as I made my way through to steerage class.

But New Holland seems to think riding in one of its new T5 Series utility tractors is the equivalent of flying business class. “Welcome to the business class of farming,” reads the company’s announcement to the press.

The T5 line

The T5 line offers three models from 98 to 115 engine horsepower (82, 91 and 98 PTO horsepower). And all three get that muscle from an FPT (Fiat Powertrain) F5C, 3.4 litre, common rail, turbo diesel that meets Interim Tier IV emissions standards. Combining cooled EGR with a diesel particulate filter is how these engines meet that standard, so they don’t require DEF.

Farmers opting for a T5 tractor get to pick one of three transmissions to bolt up to that four-cylinder engine. The base feature is a 12F/12R power shuttle. There’s a specialty 20F/20R power shuttle gearbox with a speed range of 0.2 to 40 KPH and, finally, a 24F/24R DualCommand Hi-Lo powershift.

The Hi-Lo splitter in the 24F/24R can be activated under full load, reducing forward speed by 15 per cent and boosting torque at the rear wheels by 18 per cent to help power through tough spots. And how suddenly the shuttle shift responds can be adjusted by selecting one of three separate settings. There’s a slower, gentle setting for field applications, and intermediate and a fast, very responsive rate for loader applications.

All three models come with a standard 540 and 1,000 r.p.m. PTO, but an optional 540 economy setting and a front 1,000 r.p.m. shaft are available, along with an optional front three-point hitch.

At the rear three-point hitch the option list continues. Base lift capacity for the category II hitch is 2,605 kilograms (5,745 pounds). But if you need a tractor with bigger biceps, you can double that lift capacity to 5,420 kilograms (11,949 pounds).

The T5s have two hydraulic pumps, one for the SCVs and three-point hitch and another dedicated to steering. And yet again, you get options with flow rates. Even the steering pump can be upgraded from the base flow rate of 38 litres per minute (10 gallons) to 43 LPM (11 GPM). Base implement flow rate is 65 LPM (17 GPM), but an upgrade here gives you 84 LPM (22 GPM).

The all new VisionView cab design includes the CommandArc control console which places controls and switches in a comfortable arc that the operator can easily reach. The cab has a high-visibility roof panel to improve vision.

Smaller T4 tractors

Introduced at the same time as the T5 Series, New Holland also pulled the wraps off the T4 line. There are three tractors in this group as well, with engine horsepower ratings of 84, 98 and 106 (70, 82 and 91 PTO horsepower). These ratings and many of the features available in the T4 and T5 models overlap. But while NH considers the T5 Series farming’s business class, the T4s can be spec’d out in a way that puts you back into economy class.

Both lines share the same FPT, four-cylinder engine, but transmission options are a little different. You can pick a 12F/12R or 20F/12R mechanical shuttle, or really upgrade to 12F/12R or 20F/20R power shuttles.

Three-point hitch lift capacities and hydraulic flow rates are available in a couple of different specs, too. But they’re all lower than the T5’s. The T4s can also be ordered with an open station, two-wheel drive configuration.

When it comes to pricing, a two-wheel drive, open station T4.85 — the smallest T4 model — has a base price of US$42,307. Add MFWD and a cab to the largest tractor in the line, the T4.105, and the sticker price jumps to US$64,762. The T5.95, starts at US$69,555. At the top of that range, the T5.115 has a base of US$72,825. †

About the author

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Scott Garvey

Scott Garvey is a freelance writer and video producer. He is also the former machinery editor at Grainews.

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