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The evolution of JCB’s Fastrac

First unveiled to the public at the Royal Smithfield farm show in Great Britain in 1990, the Fastrac began production the following year. Offering 125 and 140 horsepower respectively, the first two models to see production were the 120 and 145.

This mock up shows one of the original designs proposed for the Fastrac before it entered production in 1991.

This mock up shows one of the original designs proposed for the Fastrac before it entered production in 1991.
photo: JCB

Final design of those two initial production models was somewhat different than the original engineering concepts proposed in the early stages of development. Model sizes have steadily grown and drivetrain systems have changed over the years, but keeping the equal-wheeled, mid-cab design coupled with a rear deck is where brand executives say they see the future of this tractor line.

In 1994 JCB built six-wheel versions of the Fastrac for the Australian market, which were designed primarily for fertilizer spreading.

In 1994 JCB built six-wheel versions of the Fastrac for the Australian market, which were designed primarily for fertilizer spreading.
photo: JCB

With a similar configuration, the new 8000s now join the Fastrac lineup alongside the brand’s smaller 160 to 235 horsepower 4000 Series.

For a video look at a parade of models detailing the evolution of the Fastrac, visit our e-QuipTV videos page.


Where does the JCB name come from?

The company name JCB is actually the initials of its founder, Joseph Cyril Bamford. He started the company in 1945 by building end-dump farm trailers in a small garage in Uttoxeter England, using surplus World War II materials.

Today, his son Lord Anthony Bamford is chairman of the company and is generally credited with developing the Fastrac tractor concept in 1984. The first prototype was built in 1987.

Lord Anthony Bamford, son of Joseph Cyril Bamford, seen here with the first Fastrac to come off the assembly line is now chairman of JCB and is credited with developing the Fastrac concept.

Lord Anthony Bamford, son of Joseph Cyril Bamford, seen here with the first Fastrac to come off the assembly line is now chairman of JCB and is credited with developing the Fastrac concept.
photo: JCB

About the author

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Scott Garvey

Scott Garvey is a freelance writer and video producer. He is also the former machinery editor at Grainews.

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