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Case IH debuts new 5 Series air carts

Seeding Equipment: Design for the brand's new, expanded line up is based on input from its customers

Walking around Case IH’s new 950-bushel air cart during an open house at the CNH training facility in Saskatoon in June, Dan Klein, the company’s crop production marketing manager, explains all the models in the new 5 Series line represent a complete redesign. And their features are the result of extensive customer input, which involved focus groups and product evaluations by growers over several years.

“It’s the next generation,” Klein says. “Completely new from the ground up.”

Auger and conveyor systems are available, depending on the model, which are engineered to be capable of filling the carts in less than 15 minutes.

Auger and conveyor systems are available, depending on the model, which are engineered to be capable of filling the carts in less than 15 minutes.
photo: Scott Garvey

The June open house marked the debut of the brand’s new 5 Series line of air carts, which now span the 350 to 950 bushel capacity range. So their design not only includes updated engineering compared to the previous series, it includes two, much bigger versions, for a total of seven carts in all.

“We go from a 350 to 580, 760 and 950 (bushel models),” explains Klein. “Then we have the tow-between. The bigger two models are only tow-behind.”

The new flagship 950-bushel model 4955 uses three main poly tanks and one steel 35-bushel canola compartment. Although tank sizes are fixed, the new modular metering system allows for flexibility by giving producers the option to channel product flow from any tank, or combination of tanks, into any air flow.

Tanks can be equipped with optional sensors, cameras and lights that allow operators to visually confirm how much seed or fertilizer is left inside.

Tanks can be equipped with optional sensors, cameras and lights that allow operators to visually confirm how much seed or fertilizer is left inside.
photo: Scott Garvey

The components in that new metering system are made of plastic, which eliminates the risk of corrosion, and they are now electrically driven. An on-board, 24-volt alternator and batteries provide the power to turn the rollers.

The meter housings and rollers can be removed quickly without tools for replacement, clearing obstructions or repair. One metering roller works for all product types and turns inside one of three interchangeable housings that do the job of restricting product flow rates from the tanks.

“When you get down to the heart of the unit, it’s an all new metering system with electric drive meters,” says Klein. “That brings in a lot of flexibility. Through that we can blend any tank with any run. It allows us to be more accurate. It’s very easy to calibrate and very modular. We also wanted to make sure it was simple and easy to use.”

Product flow to any run can also be stopped to provide overlap control, either with an optional automatic feature or manually on base-model carts.

“With our AccuSection control system we have eight runs and can control each of them individually, shutting off any meter or having different rates of flow,” he continues. “On our base model we have the ability to manually shut off any section. With our high-flow system we can get up to 52 pounds per minute of wheat, for example.”

This mock up shows the modular, electric drive, plastic meters, which are designed to be simple to set and repair.

This mock up shows the modular, electric drive, plastic meters, which are designed to be simple to set and repair.
photo: Scott Garvey

If any of the runs develop a problem, the in-cab monitor will display information to make tracking it down much easier. Unusually high torque readings from any of the motors will cause an alert to be sent to the operator if something is jamming the roller, and the display will identify which one is causing trouble.

“All the feedback from all the motors goes to the screen,” Klein explains. “So if one is carrying a higher torque or higher temperature, it’s going to tell you that. It’s not only going to tell you you have a problem, it’s going to tell you where it’s at and what to look for.”

To get seed and fertilizer into the cart, both auger and conveyor options are available.

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“Our largest tank comes with a conveyor option that can move about 88 bushels per minute into the tanks,” says Klein. “All of our tanks, augers and options are there to basically fill the entire system in less than 15 minutes. We can basically fill every thank without moving the truck.”

And the carts feature a unique ground-level loading system that loads seed directly into the canola tank. Bags can easily be lifted into the small hopper while standing on the ground, or a tractor can position a tote above it. “The tank has a sensor to indicate how full it is,” Klein says. “All the product gets blown into the tank. It’s very gentle on the seed.”

With the new cart designs now ready for production, Klein says he expects the range of available options will eventually grow to include features like scale kits for product tanks.

“We built this cart with longevity in mind to blend a lot of products and really be versatile,” he says.

About the author

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Scott Garvey

Scott Garvey is a freelance writer and video producer. He is also the former machinery editor at Grainews.

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