How to share food with people outside of your household

First We Eat: Dropping off a meal is still one of the best ways to show you care

Worrying about food is part of the times, especially for those of us who feel responsible for others — our elderly friends and relatives, new moms with a babe in arms, immune-compromised cousins, kids at university or on a tight budget. Drop- ping off a meal is still one of the best ways to administer a long-distance hug. But even as we debate whether or not — and how — we will celebrate our holidays, our daily bread and sharing is still a necessity.

So how do we safely share food with friends or family outside of our immediate bubble? After your gift of grub is cooked and cooled, transfer it to a washable food container or wrap it carefully in foil or plastic. Delivery needs to be contactless — wearing your mask, set the packet on a neutral spot like a bench or table at least two metres from your friend or beloved. Then send those virtual hugs along when your gift is picked up.

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If you have received a gift of food, set it on an empty counter and transfer the food to your own plates or bowls. Refrigerate or store the food. Wash the emptied container, then wash the counter and your hands. When you eat that gift, your “thank you” will reach your benefactor, no matter the distance.

What food to share depends only on what you have on hand and what your beloved might enjoy. If you have it in your head to give dinner instead of seasonal treats, then homemade pizza is a great idea. It’s easy to make multiples in whatever size suits, and extras can be frozen. And it’s just so much better than anything store bought or even picked up from a pizzeria. Pizza is one of those things that I never buy. You won’t either.

If you grew tomatoes last fall — or know a gardener who did — you might have made some roasted tomato sauce for the freezer part of your pantry. It’s an indispensible staple, hands down the best instant sauce. It’s not too late to make some now; even out-of-season Roma tomatoes from far, far away make a roasted tomato sauce that outshines anything premade.

If you are delivering a pizza, underbake it marginally so that your beloved friend can reheat it without compromising the quality, and keep the arugula garnish on the side.

That’s all it takes. So first we eat, and then we can make plans for a meal together after the pandemic. Be careful out there. Feed your family and friends and yourself well this season.


Dee’s Pizzeria Pizza

Dough:

  • 1 tsp. yeast
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 1/2 c. warm-to-hot water
  • 4 c. all-purpose flour
  • 1 tbsp. kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp. dried thyme or oregano
  • 2 c. warm water, more as needed
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil

Roasted tomato sauce:

  • 3 lbs. ripe Roma tomatoes
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 1 head garlic, peeled and sliced
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Toppings:

  • 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 head garlic, peeled and sliced
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 1 bell pepper, diced
  • 8 mushrooms, sliced
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 c. sliced sausage or salami, optional
  • 2 c. grated cheese (Gruyere, cheddar, Asiago, fontina)
  • 2 c. arugula, optional

Combine the yeast, sugar and water. Let stand for about 5 minutes until it is puffy. Add the flour, salt, herbs and remaining water. Mix until the dough is smooth and elastic. Add the oil to the bowl, swirl it around to coat the sides and bottom, and roll the dough so its entire surface is oiled. Cover the bowl and refrigerate the dough to rise until doubled in bulk or until needed.

Set the oven at 450 F. Lay the tomatoes in one layer on a parchment-lined baking sheet, spread the onions and garlic over top, drizzle with the olive oil and add salt and pepper to taste. Roast until the tops are charred and the vegetables are tender, about an hour. Remove from heat and coarsely chop in a food processor.

Heat the oil in a sauté pan, then add the garlic and onions. Fry until half-done, then add remaining vegetables and optional meat. Cook over high heat for several minutes.

Remove dough from the fridge, cut in half or quarters, and shape into 4 thin flat rounds or 2 large rectangles, working with oiled hands directly on top of parchment-lined baking sheets. Let rise while you prepare the toppings.

To assemble the pizza, preheat oven to 450 F. Spoon 1/2 cup of sauce onto each pizza shell and spread thinly, then add layers of vegetables, sausage and cheese on top. Bake for 12-15 minutes, or until nicely browned. Let cool before slicing, then top with arugula.

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