Latest articles


Goodbye from Amy Jo Ehman

Prairie Palate: A fond farewell as she focuses on other projects

As we say hello to a new year, it’s time for me to say goodbye to all my friends and fans at Grainews. This is my last column. Writing a food column is a special joy. There aren’t many things that I’m any good at in this world but writing and cooking. I heart them […] Read more


Just in time for Christmas — kutya

Prairie Palate: This meatless dish of Ukrainian heritage is the first 
of 12 served on Christmas Eve

What sets Manitoba’s cuisine apart from the rest of Canada? I asked that question of Christine Hanlon, author of the new cookbook Out of Old Manitoba Kitchens, which arrived on store shelves in September. It’s chock full of old recipes that characterize the early cuisine of the postage stamp province. Some of the recipes are […] Read more



Try this Métis recipe for Bullet Soup

Prairie Palate: The name has nothing to do with ammunition 
and everything to do with little meatballs

I love my book club. We’ve been together for 24 years. Some of us have been there from the beginning and others have come and gone over time. Our newest member joined in September. I use the words “joined” and “member” loosely as there is no membership criteria beyond a love of good conversation over […] Read more


Beef stroganoff history — a mix of fact and fancy

Prairie Palate: Many think it’s a Hungarian dish but it actually originated in Russia

For some time I have been under the erroneous assumption that beef stroganoff is a Hungarian dish. Must be the paprika and sour cream. The fact is, beef stroganoff originated in Russia with nary a dash of paprika. It was originally flavoured with mustard. I learned this culinary fact in September when I visited Russia […] Read more



Running out of zucchini recipe ideas?

Prairie Palate: Try this French Zucchini Loaf for lunch or dinner

As luck would have it, I am penning these words in France. I arrived in Paris this morning full of bad airplane coffee and a fat slice of spice cake, which passed for breakfast aboard my flight. So, first things first. Settle into the hotel room then venture out in search of lunch: a good […] Read more


Following Canada’s Food Guide

Try this recipe that will fit all four categories of the current guide

The federal government is updating Canada’s Food Guide and I say it’s about time. I have a few bones to pick with the last one. For instance, take the recommendation to eat six to seven grain products per day. That’s the recommended amount for an adult woman; for men it’s eight. I grew up on […] Read more



Spudnuts — specialty of the Saskatoon summer fair

Prairie Palate: These potato doughnuts are light and fluffy and a delicious way to eat mashed potatoes


Today, I would like to tell you about the time I kept a New Year’s resolution all the way into August. Yes, eight months. No fails. As you might guess, this resolution had nothing to do with exercise, weight loss or budgeting, all of which have a low success rate beyond February 1. No, this […] Read more


Time to get outside for a picnic

Prairie Palate: Pack up a basket with no-fuss food and enjoy a meal outdoors

Have we forgotten the pleasure of picnicking? Long before the convenience of slow cookers and Crock-Pots, Prairie folks were quick to pack a basket and enjoy a pleasant meal outdoors in the company of family and friends. Many occasions called for a picnic: sport days, rodeos, end-of-school celebrations, church gatherings, Canada Day, 4th of July […] Read more



Just a salad for dinner?

Prairie Palate: Yes — if it’s a hearty one with pasta and meat like this Vietnamese Salad

You know that woman who goes out for dinner with her date (read: husband) and, despite a full and varied menu, orders a salad? OK, that’s me. I have nothing against a big bowl of pasta or a good steak (blue rare, please) or the seafood special of the day. I love it all. But […] Read more


Will your family be ‘schpocking’ at Easter?

Prairie Palate: This ancient game of cracking hard-boiled eggs traces back to Russian tradition

In some parts of the world, the new year is celebrated at the spring equinox. This makes perfect sense. At the equinox, the days get longer, the sun gets warmer and things start to grow again. Spring is nature’s new year. OK, OK, it’s still half winter here, but a New Year’s celebration would pick […] Read more