Latest articles


New bacteria enhance N-fixing performance

Natural soil molecules recruited to help increase pulse crop growth and yield

BASF Canada and Monsanto BioAg have both added different naturally occurring soil bacteria to pulse crop inoculants to enhance the nitrogen fixing capability and growth of pea and lentil crops. Pulsea crop growers are no doubt familiar with BASF’s Nodulator and Monsanto BioAG’s TagTeam pulse crop inoculants. They’ve been around for years. For the 2018 […] Read more


Putting pulses to work in your crop rotations

Soil Health: A good pulse crop can do more than fill your bank account. It also benefits the soil

Along with more pulse crops in Prairie farmers’ rotations, there has also been more research into the impact these crops have on our soil. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada researchers have recently published several research papers on this issue. This work has led one of these researchers, Dr. Chantal Hamel, to conclude that there are several […] Read more



Crop Advisor’s Casebook: What’s stressing these lentils?

A Crop Advisor's Solution from the August 29, 2017 issue of Grainews

“I have never seen anything like it in 15 years of growing lentils,” Vaughn, a southern Saskatchewan producer, told me after he discovered yellowing, unhealthy-looking lentil plants in his field the week of June 23, 2016. Our office had already received several calls from Assiniboia-area growers with similar concerns. Producers had also dropped off samples […] Read more


Detecting grain spoilage in the bin before it starts

An adaptation of cancer-screening technology offers a better and safer way to check for grain bin moisture, with a bonus of theft detection

An electromagnetic imaging technique originally designed to detect breast cancer tumours is now being adapted for a totally different use — locating spoiled grain in bins. The research project at the University of Manitoba uses electromagnetic imaging (EMI) to create a 3D profile of a bin, showing pockets of moisture which can overheat and spoil. […] Read more




Crop Advisor’s Casebook: Why are these yellow peas in a twist?

A Crop Advisor's Solution from the July 18, 2017 issue of Grainews

On June 6 of last year, I visited Mike’s 3,000-acre farm, near Morse, Sask., where he grows green lentils, yellow peas, mustard and durum. Mike was concerned about some yellowing, unhealthy-looking plants in an area of his pea crop. Two days before he noticed the damaged plants, the crop had been sprayed by a custom applicator […] Read more



Crop Advisor’s Casebook: What’s got this farmer seeing red?

A Crop Advisor's Solution from the March 28, 2017 issue of Grainews

Rick grows wheat, canola, peas and malt barley west of Hussar, Alta. On July 6, last year, he placed a call to the office after he noticed his pea plants were yellowing and browning off, not just in low-lying areas, but in random patches across the field. He thought there were a few stressors at […] Read more


Pea leaf weevil moves into new territory

Pea leaf weevils are on the move. Know what you can do about them

Pea leaf weevil numbers are on the rise. In fact, according to Scott Meers, an entomologist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, they’re moving into areas where producers have no experience with them at all. “We’ve seen a major expansion in the past several years of pea leaf weevil, especially up the west side of central […] Read more




Ed Seidle learns on the job

This on-farm research program generated info about everything from aphanomyces to root rot

How can producers make sure their on-farm trials produce useful results? Or perhaps a better question is whether growers can, or need to, run trials as rigorously as researchers? Most farmers don’t have the time or patience to run the types of on-farm experiments that scientists do, says Ed Seidle. But that doesn’t mean they […] Read more