Latest articles


Adding pulses to pasta

Cigi food researchers are finding ways to make your produce more appealing

Anyone who enjoyed Play-Doh as a child will appreciate watching Paul Ebbinghaus make pasta at the Canadian International Grains Institute’s (Cigi’s) pasta plant, on the main floor of their downtown Winnipeg office. But the international grain markets are not child’s play. The pasta plant is one part of Cigi’s strategy to keep Canadian durum competitive. […] Read more


AAFC projects focus on aphanomyces root rot in pulse crops

Good management practices still the best way to control aphanomyces in the field

While improving management practices and reducing risk factors are still the best ways to avoid root rot in pulse crops, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) researchers hope to find other tools. Syama Chatterton, an AAFC research scientist whose areas of expertise include diseases in pulse crops and soil borne diseases, is working on research projects that focus […] Read more



In-crop mechanical weed control

Controlling weeds mechanically can help overcome Group 2 resistant weeds in pulses

Group 2 resistant weeds are an annual problem for lentil producers. But there are a few outside-the-box methods that may give farmers better control than herbicide alone. University of Saskatchewan grad student Alex Alba led a study looking at three in-crop mechanical weed control methods, including: Tine harrows; Rotary hoe; and, Inter-row tillage. Alba used […] Read more


6 strategies to manage weeds in pulse crops

From tillage to pre-seed and pre-emergent herbicide applications in pulses

Pulse crop growers face unique challenges in terms of managing weed populations in their crop. Not only are pulse crops less competitive, there are limited choices for pre-seed and in-crop herbicide applications, compared to canola and corn. Plan ahead to manage weed populations and resistance using the tools available. There are many choices for grassy […] Read more



Managing aphanomyces and root rot

2017 survey results showed a high prevalence of root rot in Prairie pulse crops

Root rot is a soil-borne disease that affects the roots of developing peas and lentils. Root rot can infect crops at any stage, and once it sets in there is no way of stopping the infection. Saskatchewan Pulse crop advisor Sherrilyn Phelps advises growers on best prevention practices. Disease prevention Proper rotation is important. Peas […] Read more


Diary of a pea crop

This season was too wet, then dry, but it’s left a promising start for next year

This is the story of the pea crop on my farm near Dundurn, Sask., in the 2017 growing season. August 21, 2016 Last year we combined an 82 bushel per acre malt barley crop on this field. The soil was well supplied with water at seeding time and the May to July rain was 10.5 […] Read more



New bacteria enhance N-fixing performance

Natural soil molecules recruited to help increase pulse crop growth and yield

BASF Canada and Monsanto BioAg have both added different naturally occurring soil bacteria to pulse crop inoculants to enhance the nitrogen fixing capability and growth of pea and lentil crops. Pulsea crop growers are no doubt familiar with BASF’s Nodulator and Monsanto BioAG’s TagTeam pulse crop inoculants. They’ve been around for years. For the 2018 […] Read more


Putting pulses to work in your crop rotations

Soil Health: A good pulse crop can do more than fill your bank account. It also benefits the soil

Along with more pulse crops in Prairie farmers’ rotations, there has also been more research into the impact these crops have on our soil. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada researchers have recently published several research papers on this issue. This work has led one of these researchers, Dr. Chantal Hamel, to conclude that there are several […] Read more



Crop Advisor’s Casebook: What’s stressing these lentils?

A Crop Advisor's Solution from the August 29, 2017 issue of Grainews

“I have never seen anything like it in 15 years of growing lentils,” Vaughn, a southern Saskatchewan producer, told me after he discovered yellowing, unhealthy-looking lentil plants in his field the week of June 23, 2016. Our office had already received several calls from Assiniboia-area growers with similar concerns. Producers had also dropped off samples […] Read more


Detecting grain spoilage in the bin before it starts

An adaptation of cancer-screening technology offers a better and safer way to check for grain bin moisture, with a bonus of theft detection

An electromagnetic imaging technique originally designed to detect breast cancer tumours is now being adapted for a totally different use — locating spoiled grain in bins. The research project at the University of Manitoba uses electromagnetic imaging (EMI) to create a 3D profile of a bin, showing pockets of moisture which can overheat and spoil. […] Read more