Latest articles


Two diseases to watch for in peas

Ascochyta blight and aphanomyces root rot occur in dry years as well as wet

If you’re growing peas for the first time this year, of if you haven’t grown them in a while, you’ll want to watch for these two diseases in your fields: ascochyta blight and aphanomyces root rot. The disease that is perhaps most concerning, most visible and most likely to cause yield loss is ascochyta, or […] Read more


Crop advisor casebook: Why are rows of these lentils yellowing and stunted?

A Crop Advisor's Solution from the April 23, 2019 issue of Grainews

Cory owns a 4,000-acre grain farm near Cupar, Sask. His crop rotation consists of lentils, wheat, durum and canola. It was around the middle of June when I received a call from Cory, who was concerned about his lentil crop after he noticed that in certain rows the plants were stunted and the leaves of […] Read more



Worried about pea disease? Try peaola

Intercropping peas and canola can minimize disease and lower production costs

With international pea processor Roquette opening a plant in Portage la Prairie, Man., in 2020, many growers will be thinking about taking advantage of the opportunity. Some, however, will be worried about one of the biggest challenges of growing peas: disease. There may be a solution, though. Researchers and experimental farmers are finding answers in […] Read more


Pulse and soybean diseases to watch

Dry conditions in 2018 gave pulse growers a break, but there’s lots to watch for in 2019

While dry conditions during the 2018 growing season didn’t stop all instances of foliar, stem and root rot diseases across Western Canada, pulse growers didn’t see the high levels of pulse or soybean diseases associated with warm, moist conditions. But that doesn’t mean scouting won’t be necessary in 2019. The main diseases in pulse and […] Read more



Roquette tweaks pea plant plans

The pea-processing plant is still under construction, with expanded plans

It’s been two years since French company Roquette announced its plan to build the world’s largest pea-processing plant in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba. And while the company did break ground in September of 2017, construction was suspended in the spring of 2018, but began again this past October. Roquette expects the new plant to process […] Read more


Yes to peas, no to aphanomyces

Peas are a great crop for the Prairies, but aphanomyces root rot is a major threat

Peas as a human and animal feed have been around since 5000 BC. The pea plant, a nitrogen-fixing legume, originated in the cooler areas of the Himalayas and was subsequently cultivated extensively in the Mediterranean basin. Peas, dried peas in particular, were a major part of the diet in the U.K. in the 19th and […] Read more



Preventing and controlling aphanomyces root rot

Aphanomyces root rot is not airborne or seedborne, like clubroot of canola, the disease is soil borne. This fungus, like clubroot, forms resting spores that can last for 10 years in infested soil. Infection of the legume host can take place at anytime in the season but is not obvious early in the year. The […] Read more


Crop advisor’s casebook: What’s chewing on these chickpea roots?

A Crop Advisor's Solution from the December 4, 2018 issue of Grainews

Late May last spring, I received a call from Warren who had some questions about chickpea emergence. Warren owns a mixed grain farm near Big Beaver, Sask., where he grows Kabuli chickpeas, red lentils, canola and durum. He was concerned about his chickpea crop — some areas were not emerging as well as others a […] Read more




Cereals clean up before a pulse crop

Planting a cereal crop can help set up your next pulse crop for success

Cereals are more than just a rotational crop between your canola and lentils; they can play a key role in setting up next year’s pulse crop for success by helping clean up your fields of weeds and soil-borne disease. When you look at weed control and resistance management, cereal crops offer the broadest range of […] Read more