Your Reading List

Coming soon: an AGCO air seeder

Last
week Amity Technology and Wil-Rich, implement manufacturers,
announced they are merging; and, most significantly, they have agreed
to form a joint venture with AGCO for the distribution of air seeding
and tillage equipment. AGCO’s press release describes the Amity seeding equipment as something that could compliment its equipment line in North America and Eastern Europe.

As

part of the deal, AGCO will acquire a 50 percent interest in selected
air seeding and tillage product lines currently sold under the Amity,
Wil-Rich and Wishek brand names. The resulting joint venture will be
based in Fargo, N.D. The newly-merged company will continue to
develop, manufacture and distribute products sold under their
existing brand names as well as selected AGCO brands in the future.
In all likelihood those AGCO names will be Massey Ferguson,
Challenger and Sunflower (but that’s an assumption at this point).

The
Amity/Wil-Rich press release claimed the new arrangement is expected
to be finalized before the end of this year, so things seem to be
moving quickly. “We’re excited about the opportunity to
expand our product offering and geographic footprint through this
partnership with AGCO,” said Howard Dahl, Amity’s president and
chief executive officer. “We see tremendous opportunities to
continue to innovate with our products, and to expand our reach

through AGCO’s worldwide distribution network.”


Assuming the deal goes
through, though, it would be a significant addition to AGCO’s North
American product line. After CNH’s introduction of their Case IH and
New Holland-branded air drills last summer, AGCO has been the only
one of the big three without one.

This
announcement certainly seems to make sense for AGCO, especially after
Martin Richenhagen’s recent public comments about the brand striving
to increase it’s sales and presence in the North American market (he
is AGCO’s chairman, president and CEO).

But

it does pose one interesting question: If all the major manufacturers
end up with their own air drill, how will that affect the long-term
marketing plans of the remaining short-line, pairie-based companies
that offer their own versions? After all, they typically retail their
drills through major-brand dealerships.

amity low res.jpg

Amity
Technology’s display at this year’s Western Canada Farm Progress
Show. The company was founded in 1996 and is based in Fargo, N.D. It
was formed out of Concord, Inc. when that company was sold to Case
Corporation in 1996.

In
other seeding-related news, Dutch Industries just announced the
release of their new Universal Series opener
.
The biggest innovation with this product is its body design. It
enables a farmer to switch from Single Shoot to Double Shoot to
fertilizer knife all with the same body.

The
Universal Series opener will fit most shank styles, angles, and tips.
“In the past, openers were not designed to have more than one
option for replaceable tips or fertilizer tubes,” says R&D
manager Brian Cruson. “This has changed with the new Universal
Series, wherein farmers can now choose from many different tips that
offer more or less separation vertically and horizontally without
changing their opener body. They also have the option to use several
different fertilizer types with the wide variety of fertilizer tubes
that are available with the Universal Series.”

low res dutch.jpg

Dutch
Industries just announced the release of their new Universal Series
opener, designed for low draft requirements and good performance in
wet conditions. Photo: courtesy Dutch Industries.

In
addition, the company’s press release claims these new double shoot
tips have a very low draft requirement. “The reduced wing angle
allows for less soil disturbance and the gumbo-style tip completely
eliminates plugging,” it reads. “Our engineering team did a
lot of testing at the University of Saskatoon’s soil bin to determine
the best possible design to reduce soil disturbance, improve seed
placement, and eliminate plugging issues,” adds Cruson. “After
testing many openers’ sets in the spring of 2010, we found that the
New Universal Series opener surpassed our expectations. We had one
farmer that was getting stuck in his field and the openers still
didn’t plug.”

Good
luck with your 2011 seeding plans.

Scott

About the author

Machinery Editor

Scott Garvey is the machinery editor for Grainews.

Comments

explore

Stories from our other publications