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John Deere’s Gator family grows

Show visitors could drive 
new models over a test track

Visitors to the U.S. Farm Progress Show in Illinois in August were able to take a spin in one of the new John Deere Gators. They had a choice between taking the new gas-powered XUV835 or diesel XUV865 Utility Vehicles for a turn around a specially constructed demonstration track on the show grounds.

For operators who need to travel over rugged terrain, the 54-horsepower XUV835 and 23-horsepower XUV865 offer tight turning and balanced weight distribution. The XUV835 can reach speeds of over 45 miles per hour (72 kilometres per hour), and the XUV865 offers a top speed of better than 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h). Both units feature an 11-gallon (41-litre) fuel tank.

These are also the first units in the Gator family to have three-wide seating, the new XUV835 and XUV865 include an adjustable driver’s seat, improved legroom and tilt steering. The XUV835M also offers a premium cab to make things easier on passengers in all conditions with available HVAC and heating. The heating feature also defrosts the windshield.

The new vehicles include increased payload capacity, which when combined with towing capacity, hits 2,000 pounds (909 kilograms).

The Gator XUV835R and Gator XUV865R come standard with a climate-controlled cab with premium cloth seating. The R trim level also includes upgraded attachment ready wiring to allow quicker installation of roof lights or other electrical attachments, plus the R models come standard with brighter, longer lasting LED headlights.

Deere is also introducing two more Gators to the line, the HPX615E with a gasoline engine and the diesel HPX815E. They get an overall load rating of 1,400 pounds (636 kg) and a towing capacity of 1,300 pounds (590 kg). They’ll be available from dealers late in 2017.

There is a full range of over 90 attachments, from snow blades to winches that are designed to mate with the Gator line.

For 2017, John Deere is introducing the first Gators with three-wide seating.
photo: Mark Moore

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